ask questions and whatnot   queer miswestern artist seeking bodies of water and penpals. makes lots of drawings, writes lots of letters. obsessed with siouxsie sioux and sweets. indulgent. this blog is my art mashed up with things i like and read about and probably siouxsie and the banshees videos. also check out rebeccajonesprints.wordpress.com for "formal archiving" (what?) of things i have made.

saatchiart:

"I don’t listen to what art critics say. I don’t know anybody who needs a critic to find out what art is.” –Jean-Michel Basquiat (Photo: New York Times Magazine, 1985)

saatchiart:

"I don’t listen to what art critics say. I don’t know anybody who needs a critic to find out what art is.” –Jean-Michel Basquiat (Photo: New York Times Magazine, 1985)

(via violencegang)

— 22 hours ago with 16100 notes

micdotcom:

Powerful photos capture the student protests in Mexico barely anyone is talking about 

The unfolding protests gripping Mexico began in the small town of Iguala, in the southwest region of Guerrero state, where the disappearance of 43 student teachers on the night of Sept. 26 has sparked outrage amid allegations of collaboration between local police and organized crime.

(via sweaterwitches)

— 1 day ago with 33834 notes

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Group one occupies Manchester and Boyle for their “They think it’s a game” civil disobedience action.

Early morning, Monday, October 13th

(via raychillster)

— 6 days ago with 13957 notes
Day 62: Mike Brown was murdered 2 months ago today.

justice4mikebrown:

Darren Wilson is still free and still on paid administrative leave.

(via sweaterwitches)

— 1 week ago with 37963 notes
beautifulmars:

Sand Patch Monitoring in Ophir Chasma

what.

beautifulmars:

Sand Patch Monitoring in Ophir Chasma

what.

(Source: uahirise.org)

— 1 week ago with 207 notes
#mars  #oceanic 
printeresting:

knmacneil: Printmaking studio at CofC

ahhhhhhhhhhhh

printeresting:

knmacneil: Printmaking studio at CofC

ahhhhhhhhhhhh

(via withregardto)

— 1 week ago with 308 notes

janellebeasley:

image

Here’s a new gif!

This pink family’s got a special visitor!!!

gosh my friend janellebeasley is just the greatest.

— 2 weeks ago with 6 notes
#bat gif  #bats  #collage  #vintage magazines 
Rainy view from my room. An afternoon to stay in and write letters.

Rainy view from my room. An afternoon to stay in and write letters.

— 2 weeks ago
#rain 

Sent some patches to Australia today!

Check out my screenprinted patches and other prints on etsy:
shop name: floatingbedpress
shop owner: b.jones (yours truly)

— 2 weeks ago with 1 note
#floating bed press  #b.jones  #printmaking  #screenprinting  #etsy  #patches  #mail  #back patches  #small patches  #drawing  #silkscreen  #fabric prints  #Rebecca Jones  #rebecca jones prints  #mail art  #envelope art 
berndwuersching:

Anselm KieferThe Rhine (Melancholia), 1982-2013

i have only skimmed the visual surface of anselm kiefer’s work but no longer! goin deep.

berndwuersching:

Anselm Kiefer
The Rhine (Melancholia), 1982-2013

i have only skimmed the visual surface of anselm kiefer’s work but no longer! goin deep.

— 3 weeks ago with 454 notes
#anselm kiefer 
baldhipmag:

Marooned, Rebecca Jones

this piece is a response to a poem we published in issue one by Rebecca’s sister, Kathleen Jones. here’s what they had to say about their collaborative process, one which reaches back to each other from Minnesota to North Carolina.
-Editors, baldhip magazine

When/ how did this start?
Kathleen: We are sisters, and ever since we were kids we have made art and written stories and poetry. I am five years older than Rebecca, and I used to open up my notebooks to find that she had embellished my drawings. I found this hilarious and wonderful. 

Rebecca: As we got older, Kathleen started writing more and drawing less, and I started doing the opposite. 

Kathleen: A few years ago we started collaborating more intentionally. Rebecca did the illustrations and cover art for a poetry chapbook I made in grad school. In my MFA program, we design broadsides for everyone’s thesis reading, and my broadside featured Rebecca’s art. The project shown here was much more spontaneous: I sent Rebecca a letter and included “Marooned.” Just a few days later, she sent me a picture of the drawing it inspired. 
 
Do you work concurrently or is your collaboration a type of call and response?
Rebecca: It depends on the project. So far, our collaborations have mainly happened when Kathleen has written something and I have illustrated it after the writing is largely done. In the future, we intend to plan and execute more pieces concurrently. 

Describe your process.
Kathleen: “Marooned” was a little different from usual because we didn’t consult at all—I had no idea Rebecca was even working on a drawing. 

Rebecca: I felt that “Marooned” was a very visual poem; in my own work I often narrow concepts into symbols so I responded to the poem immediately.  

Kathleen: Usually, when I commission work from Rebecca, we both generate lists of images from the work. 

Rebecca: The process is a blend of figuring out what images are inextricable from the intent of the writing and which images I see as a reader. Usually Kathleen has some idea of the imagery she would like to see for her work but we go back and forth with ideas…for example, with the chapbook I made several preliminary sketches then we discussed refinements. 
 
How does working together affect your relationship outside your art? Are you closer/ less close? 
Kathleen: We are definitely closer than we would be if we didn’t enjoy working together creatively. Even if we weren’t collaborators, I would be a huge fan of Rebecca’s art and would want Rebecca to read my poetry. She is an incredibly valuable and trustworthy reader. We always ask each other questions about our work out of a genuine interest. 
 

Rebecca: Making a drawing from Kathleen’s writing is a matter of peeling back layers to figure out where she’s coming from. It is interesting to make my own interpretation of her words but even more meaningful to ask her why she writes what she does, get the backstory of the writing in order to make the drawings as genuine as possible. Putting thoughts into words and images is personal work and discussing personal work in this way definitely makes us closer. 
 
Do you feel your poetry translates well into art?
Kathleen: It was exciting to see the illustration of “Marooned” because the train tracks were at once nothing like the tracks I pictured and a perfectly accurate view of how the poem feels to my sister. When I think of the poem now, I think of both the tracks in my head and the tracks she created. Rebecca’s art style is as recognizable to me as handwriting, and I love the experience of seeing my own work turn into something that looks and feels like her own. At the same time, I don’t believe my poems have ever lost any of their own style or meaning upon being translated. 
 
How does working in different mediums affect the collaborative process?
Kathleen: It’s interesting to collaborate with someone who uses tools I don’t know how to use. From a technical standpoint, we have to ask each other a lot of questions about what is possible. 

Rebecca: As someone who enjoys creating visual narratives but does not make writing a decidedly creative practice, I love being able to run with a narrative created by my sister.
 
Do you work off other inspiring artworks or only each other?
Kathleen: I write a lot of ekphrastic poetry, so I’m constantly drawing inspiration from lots of different types of visual sources. I have some of Rebecca’s artwork hanging up in my house; I need to write some poetry about them! 

Rebecca: I make a lot of drawings and prints based on words and music. 

Why collaborate?
WE ARE MERE MORTALS. WE MUST COLLABORATE TO SURVIVE. Also it’s really fun

Here is an interview of my sister kathleenejones and me talking about collaborating! Baldhip Mag kindly featured a drawing I did based on Kathleen’s poem “Marooned.”

baldhipmag:

Marooned, Rebecca Jones

this piece is a response to a poem we published in issue one by Rebecca’s sister, Kathleen Jones. here’s what they had to say about their collaborative process, one which reaches back to each other from Minnesota to North Carolina.

-Editors, baldhip magazine

When/ how did this start?

Kathleen: We are sisters, and ever since we were kids we have made art and written stories and poetry. I am five years older than Rebecca, and I used to open up my notebooks to find that she had embellished my drawings. I found this hilarious and wonderful.

Rebecca: As we got older, Kathleen started writing more and drawing less, and I started doing the opposite.

Kathleen: A few years ago we started collaborating more intentionally. Rebecca did the illustrations and cover art for a poetry chapbook I made in grad school. In my MFA program, we design broadsides for everyone’s thesis reading, and my broadside featured Rebecca’s art. The project shown here was much more spontaneous: I sent Rebecca a letter and included “Marooned.” Just a few days later, she sent me a picture of the drawing it inspired.

 

Do you work concurrently or is your collaboration a type of call and response?

Rebecca: It depends on the project. So far, our collaborations have mainly happened when Kathleen has written something and I have illustrated it after the writing is largely done. In the future, we intend to plan and execute more pieces concurrently.

Describe your process.

Kathleen: “Marooned” was a little different from usual because we didn’t consult at all—I had no idea Rebecca was even working on a drawing.

Rebecca: I felt that “Marooned” was a very visual poem; in my own work I often narrow concepts into symbols so I responded to the poem immediately.  

Kathleen: Usually, when I commission work from Rebecca, we both generate lists of images from the work.

Rebecca: The process is a blend of figuring out what images are inextricable from the intent of the writing and which images I see as a reader. Usually Kathleen has some idea of the imagery she would like to see for her work but we go back and forth with ideas…for example, with the chapbook I made several preliminary sketches then we discussed refinements.

 

How does working together affect your relationship outside your art? Are you closer/ less close?

Kathleen: We are definitely closer than we would be if we didn’t enjoy working together creatively. Even if we weren’t collaborators, I would be a huge fan of Rebecca’s art and would want Rebecca to read my poetry. She is an incredibly valuable and trustworthy reader. We always ask each other questions about our work out of a genuine interest.

 

Rebecca: Making a drawing from Kathleen’s writing is a matter of peeling back layers to figure out where she’s coming from. It is interesting to make my own interpretation of her words but even more meaningful to ask her why she writes what she does, get the backstory of the writing in order to make the drawings as genuine as possible. Putting thoughts into words and images is personal work and discussing personal work in this way definitely makes us closer.

 

Do you feel your poetry translates well into art?

Kathleen: It was exciting to see the illustration of “Marooned” because the train tracks were at once nothing like the tracks I pictured and a perfectly accurate view of how the poem feels to my sister. When I think of the poem now, I think of both the tracks in my head and the tracks she created. Rebecca’s art style is as recognizable to me as handwriting, and I love the experience of seeing my own work turn into something that looks and feels like her own. At the same time, I don’t believe my poems have ever lost any of their own style or meaning upon being translated.

 

How does working in different mediums affect the collaborative process?

Kathleen: It’s interesting to collaborate with someone who uses tools I don’t know how to use. From a technical standpoint, we have to ask each other a lot of questions about what is possible.

Rebecca: As someone who enjoys creating visual narratives but does not make writing a decidedly creative practice, I love being able to run with a narrative created by my sister.

 

Do you work off other inspiring artworks or only each other?

Kathleen: I write a lot of ekphrastic poetry, so I’m constantly drawing inspiration from lots of different types of visual sources. I have some of Rebecca’s artwork hanging up in my house; I need to write some poetry about them!

Rebecca: I make a lot of drawings and prints based on words and music.

Why collaborate?

WE ARE MERE MORTALS. WE MUST COLLABORATE TO SURVIVE. Also it’s really fun

Here is an interview of my sister kathleenejones and me talking about collaborating! Baldhip Mag kindly featured a drawing I did based on Kathleen’s poem “Marooned.”
— 1 month ago with 7 notes
#kathleen e jones  #baldhip mag  #baldhip magazine  #literary magazine  #poetry  #drawing  #ink  #black and white  #marooned  #island  #creative writing  #daily routines  #stranded  #rebecca jones  #rebecca jones prints  #b.jones  #symbols in art  #symbols  #visual writing  #collaborative art  #sisters  #sister collaboration 
I would like to make a short film of images processed like this and write music for it.

I would like to make a short film of images processed like this and write music for it.

(Source: jrmgh, via marllevamelejos)

— 1 month ago with 625 notes